Photo Credit: Frank Kovalchek

Slices of Life: Making a Living

Slices of Life:  Making a Living

Hope Sunrise HS

Hope Sunrise HS

The economics of the Eastern Kenai has largely been resource driven. In order to make a living, particularly in the earlier days, it required a fair bit of grit, resourcefulness, and willingness to try just about anything.  This page explores the economics of this region.


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TERN LAKE:  Road Construction on the Eastern Kenai

This is Now and That was Then:  Episode 7
Relevance: ***

In order for the Kenai to grow economically, roads had to be built. Considering the jumble of mountains that make up the area, this was no easy feat.  This episode takes a look at the necessity and the history of road construction in the Eastern Kenai Peninsula.


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DREAM OF THE NORTH: Alaska Nellie

Trails Across Time:  Pgs 68-69
Relevance: ***

Nellie Lawings was determined to live in Alaska. The question, though, was how was she going to make a living? This reading illustrates the pratice, so common in Alaska, of reinventing oneself and doing whatever is necessary to make a living.


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RUSSIAN AMERICA

Secondary Curriculum:  Chapter 5
Relevance: ***

What were the economics of the Russian sea otter trade? What was the social and economic role of the indigenous people who were caught up in the trade? This lesson uses a shared-inquiry to analyze business correspondence between Baranov and Shelikhov.

HOPE AND SUNRISE: TALE OF TWO CITIES

Secondary Curriculum:  Chapter 6
Relevance: ***
In 1900, the town of Sunrise boasted to be the largest town in the territory. A few years later it was a ghost town while its much smaller sister-town, Hope, still survived. Why? This lesson takes a look at the elements needed to create and sustain a town.

HOPE, ALASKA: A TALE OF ONE CITY

Secondary Curriculum:  Chapter 7
Relevance: ***

In order to continue to survive, Hope had to economically evolve from a gold rush town into something more sustainable. This lesson provides demographic and census data to interpret this change.

BYWAYS AND HIGHWAYS:  The Living Source

Secondary Curriculum:  Chapter 9
Relevance: **

Students are provided several ‘artifacts’ found in an abandoned truck. Among these is a hand written letter from old timer, Jack Lean. From this letter students can get a glimpse of making a living in a much earlier time.


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HOPE MUSEUM

Field Trip Notes:  Site 5
Relevance: ***

The museum in Hope is a wonderful place to learn about what was required to make a living in this mining community.  Arrange a visit and tour; you might even get a chance to ‘pan some color.’


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SEWARD’S GOOD TIME GIRLS

The Spaces Between:  Pgs 38-59
Relevance: ***

This chapter takes an academic look at the social, political, and economic implications of the Seward Red Light District. The article explains how The Line was not only tolerated but even respected by the general population. Pages 43-51 details Carol Erwin’s life as a self described hobo, madam, successful business woman, and painter.


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MEMORIES OF OLD SUNRISE:  Entire Book

Relevance: ***

The entire autobiography of Albert Morgan provides an introspective look into the economics of the Kenai  gold mining era.