Photo Credit: Frank Kovalchek

Slices of Life: Life in the Northland

Slices of Life:  Life in the Northland

Hope Sunrise Historical Society

Life in Alaska has never been conventional. There are benefits and hardships living in a land that is full of resources yet often lacking in amenities.  From the earliest times, indigenous people, homesteaders, miners, and even more recent residents have had to make do in order to live in this remote corner of the earth.


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MT ALICE / MT EVA

This is Now and That was Then:  Episode 1
Relevance: **

For decades, the Lowell family lived on a homestead far away from any other settlement.  However, imagine what it was like as the Lowell’s remote homestead was transformed (nearly overnight) into a town with electricity, plumbing, and roads.

VICTOR CREEK: The Photography of Harry Johnson

This is Now and That was Then:  Episode  5
Relevance: ***

This is the story of Harry Johnson, photographer.  Johnson turned his camera on various subjects including mining, trapping, and people during the early 1900’s.  These photos provide a unique opportunity to analyze and interpret  life at the turn of the century.

MOOSE PASS / ESTES GROCERY

This is Now and That was Then: Episode 6
Relevance: ***

Originally a railroad camp, Moose Pass was homesteaded by the family of Ed Estes. But how does one make a living in a remote area with little economic opportunities?


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PROSPECTING THE SIX MILE DRAINAGE/ MINING AT LYNX CREEK

Tales of Old Sunrise:  Chapter 3 and 4 
Relevance: ***

Through the eyes of Albert Morgan, we get a glimpse into what it was like to be a miner in the days of the Kenai Gold Rush. Through these chapters, the culture of miners, vigilante justice, and native relations can be examined as well as the realities of trying to strike it rich.


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MRS. HERRING PETE

The Spaces Between:  Pgs 197-207
Relevance: ***

Josephine Sather, along with her first husband, homesteaded a remote island near Nuka Bay on the coast of Alaska. From this isolated spot they farmed foxes using the meat from local sea lions as fox food. After her first husband passed away, she remarried Herring Pete Sather which allowed her to continue living the life she loved including documenting song birds, killing eagles, and protecting the property from bears.

SEWARD ALASKA 1904-1906

The Space Between:  Pgs 3 – 13
Relevance: ***

This chapter gives a raw taste of early rough-and-tumble Seward. Although steam travel is not a central focus, the writing provides an idea of what it meant when “the steamer arrived’ during the early ‘railroad years.’

GLACIER BREEZES, COASTAL LIFE IN 1920’S ALASKA

The Spaces Between:  Pgs 92-107
Relevance: ***

Frank B. Camp was the editor of the Seward Gateway newspaper in 1920-21. Through his poems and editorials, we get an candid, mystifying, and sometimes humorous look into territorial life of the time.