Photo Credit: Frank Kovalchek

Slices of Life: Christmas

Slices of Life:  Christmas

Perhaps the best way to understand life in early Alaska is for students to examine and compare Christmas in the newly settled land.


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WAITING FOR SANTA

The Spaces Between:  Pgs 124-128
Relevance: ***

This article is a good view of the realities of a Christmas in the wilderness in 1920.  As Christmas approached all the shops were decorated and children’s Christmas parties were held.  Students at Seward High were busy preparing for the annual Christmas Eve program of songs, recitations, and skits.  But alas, the ‘Santa Claus Ship” had not arrived.  The S.S. Victoria, with all the gifts and supplies from the Outside, had not arrived.  As days passed by, fears grew about the fate of the steamer.

FOX ISLAND CHRISTMAS

The Space Between:  Pgs 129- 133
Relevance: ***

Rockwell Kent and his son have spent the Autumn 1918 at a fox farm on a remote island in Resurrection Bay. As December 25 approaches, Kent is determined to surprise both his son and fox farmer, Olsen, with a special celebration.

CHRISTMAS TREE ON THE MOUNTAIN

The Spaces Between:  Pgs 223-227
Relevance: ***

At Thanksgiving time, every day, a tree is lit high upon Bear Mountain above the Seward town-site.  It serves as a beacon for the season.  But when did this tradition begin?  In 1961, Seward was rife in internal conflict. A simple tree, lit by a civic minded citizen, allowed everyone to stop and consider the season. The tree is a tradition, and lesson, that remains.


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CHRISTMAS TREE ON MOUNTAIN BRINGS FRACTURED SEWARD TOGETHER

Alaska Dispatch News  December 24, 2011
Relevance: ***

Digital version of Capra’s article “Christmas Tree on Mountain.”