Photo Credit: Frank Kovalchek

Russian Alaska

Russian Alaska

Russian Boat Yard by James Sheilds

Vitus Bering, a Dutch officer for the Russian navy, was charged with finding, mapping, and claiming the coast of Alaska. On his second journey he finally caught sight of land to the east of Prince William Sound. However, not only was land discovered, but also the sea otter. This brought about the first economic rush into the region.


Slide5
RESURRECTION BAY

This is Now and That Was Then:  Episode 1
Relevance: ***

Alexander Baranoff arrived (and named) Resurrection Bay in 1792. Despite many difficulties, he was successful in establishing a trading fort and built a ship named The Phoenix.


RUSSIAN AMERICA

Trails Across Time: pgs 40-49
Relevance: ***
This chapter starts with Russia’s quest to locate and lay claim to North America lands not yet European flagged. It continues to the fur trade and the naming of Resurrection Bay and the eventual construction of The Phoenix.

WHEN RUMORS RUN WILD

Trails Across Time: Pg 49
Relevance: ***
Sometimes history goes awry. For years it was thought (even published) that a Russian penal colony existed near the confluence of Russian and Kenai Rivers. Local historian, Mona Painter, worked to unravel the tale and reveal the truth.


Slide3
RUSSIAN AMERICA

Secondary Curriculum:  Chapter 5
Relevance: ***
Imagine the difficulties and time lag of corresponding across the ocean during the 18th century. Students participate in a shared inquiry to analyze correspondence between Alexander Baranov and Shelikhov from 1793-1795.


 internet-icon-md
BARANOV BUILDS FIRST SHIP IN RESURRECTION BAY (PART 1)
BARNOV’S SHIPS PLYED ALASKA WATERS (PART 2)

Seward Phoenix Log:  June 6 and 13, 2013

Two news articles detail the building of the ships in Resurrection Bay during the days of the Russian fur trade.